Category: Health and Fitness

Paddle Healthy: Sean Poynter

After a month long intensive training program at the New Zealand Starboard SUP Academy, Sean Poynter is in the best shape of his life. Photo: Mike Fields

After a month-long training program at the New Zealand Starboard SUP Academy, Sean Poynter is in the best shape of his life. Photo: Mike Fields

Paddle Healthy: Sean Poynter

After a month of intensive training and personalized fitness assessment at the New Zealand Starboard SUP Academy in January, World Tour standout Sean Poynter says he’s in the best shape of his life. He left the Academy with a new approach to health beyond just a physical change. Poynter also changed his mental habits, eating habits and lifestyle to reach a balance that optimizes his athletic prowess. Here, he breaks down just what happened to him at the Academy, and how it changed his take on health, fitness and mind control.

SUP: Tell us about your New Zealand training camp.

SP: I was sent to New Zealand with Connor Baxter, Zane Schweitzer and a handful of other Starboard athletes for this training program, and at first I didn’t know what to expect. It was a school of learning about our bodies and training, testing the different aspects of our outer nervous system to find a balance that works best for each of us individually. We learned a ton about ourselves and our bodies, what makes us tick and how we need to tick. I took so much from it; it completely changed my life.

 What new fitness strategies are you implementing as a result of the Academy?

I’m doing a program to extend what I learned there, which is largely composed of different variations of paddling and running. The academy introduced me to a lot of new training elements that I’d never done before, and it taught me that simple exercises are best for what I’m trying to accomplish. It’s a program that I now have to take on through the year so I’ll be training in a way that promotes the best of me. To not overwork or underwork myself.

 How are you changing your diet?

The whole idea is simplification. You want to simplify your life as much as you can, and with that comes food. You are what you eat and there’s no need to over complicate what you put in your body. That’s why I’m making the switch to all organic. I’m eating good proteins and good carbs, not manufactured junk. I make sure it’s fresh because that has a big effect on how your system processes food. I’m eating way cleaner, way more simply, and drinking a ton of water. I’ll also be doing a three-month juice cleanse soon.

 What other techniques are you implementing into your training?

I’ve been doing Fartlek training, which is basically training tailored to every individual’s level of output. By knowing what my body can put out, I can adjust my workout to train to maintain the desired balance. Along with paddling and running I do a lot of resistance stuff, like dragging a water bottle behind my board to add resistance while I paddle. I do a lot of running in intervals; going different percentages of my capacity. Also running stairs, running hills, fast walking, running in waste deep water, those kinds of things. Again, simple; running shoes and a paddleboard have me feeling stronger than I’ve ever felt.

How do you maintain your mental health, motivation and competitive focus?

Having a goal that I really care about is the number one thing that keeps me focused. For instance, I want to win a world title. I’m motivated and focused on achieving that. Also, I realized that I perform best when I’m in a calm state, so I’m now doing things like meditation, stretching, listening to a certain type of music that calms me. But it all comes back to having that one goal. Set a goal and from there it trickles down.

For more from SUP the mag on Sean Poynter, click here.

To learn more about Fartlek training and the methods employed by the Starboard SUP Academy, click here.

 

The post Paddle Healthy: Sean Poynter appeared first on SUP Magazine.

Inflatables and Groms–From Chile with Love

A month of SUP in Patagonia from Mark Kalch on Vimeo.

Yeah, inflatables and GoPros are still pretty awesome. Especially when you can use one for exploring everything–rivers, lakes, oceans–and the other for capturing it all. ‘Capturing it all’ becomes especially relevant if the groms are along. Here’s how Mark Kalch sees Chile with his brood, a packable board and a small camera.

The post Inflatables and Groms–From Chile with Love appeared first on SUP Magazine.

2015 Standup World Tour Kicks Off With Na Kama Kai Youth Challenge

2015 Standup World Tour Kicks Off With Na Kama Kai Youth Challenge

Competitors, kids, families and fans are all gathered here at Turtle Bay Resort on Oahu’s fabled North Shore this morning, with competition officially commencing for the opening events of the 2015 Standup World Tour. While contest coordinators wait for conditions to improve to begin the Turtle Bay Women’s Pro — the opening event of the women’s 2015 SUWT season — conditions on the inside section at Turtle Bay West have cleaned up enough to kick off the full day of action with the Turtle Bay Pro Na Kama Kai Youth Challenge, the season’s premier youth event showcasing the next generation of the world’s top SUP surfers.

The official call for the Turtle Bay Women’s Pro will be made following the Na Kama Kai competition, followed by the Patron’s Team Shootout — a new contest that involves teams competing head-to-head on giant inflatable SUPs.

Conditions are currently tricky with shifty overhead peaks and a fading mid-period WNW swell, rendering ability to assess the ocean and strategically read waves a critical component of the competition.

First-call for the Men’s event, the Sunset Beach Pro, will take place tomorrow morning with a possible start at 8:00 a.m.

Tune in to the Waterman League website to watch the LIVE webcast, and keep tabs on the action with the SUWT’s live blog. Also, visit the SUWT Facebook page and follow them on Instagram @standupworldtour.

And, keep updated with daily recaps, behind-the-scenes event coverage and athlete interviews at SUPthemag.com.

 

The post 2015 Standup World Tour Kicks Off With Na Kama Kai Youth Challenge appeared first on SUP Magazine.

Finding The Glide

Searching for Wind In Remote Baja

Words: Will Taylor Photos: Chris Bishow

The butterflies flutter inside of his stomach and his brain works faster than it should. It’s written on his face, red with sunburn and bellowed in deep breaths across his chapped lips. He wants to do this but doesn’t want to relive yesterday’s experience.

Who can blame him? Paddling out through girthy, overhead waves in the wind on a 16-foot downwind board over shallow, barnacle-strewn basalt boulders is an intimidating proposition. Especially if you paddled out in the same place yesterday, took three waves on the head, broke the steering system of your board and had to be picked up by a fishing boat on your first downwind paddle in a remote region of the Baja Peninsula.

7This fall Brandon Heiser won SUP magazine’s “Find the Glide” contest where downwind paddlers from all over the world posted their favorite downwind runs to the guidebook at SUPthemag.com (It’s now one of the world’s most complete downwind reference guides and still building. We’re just a little proud of ourselves). Brandon’s Mercer Island, Wash. glide on the Puget Sound was chosen as the winner by SIC Maui, the program’s sponsor, because of its solid information and unique location.

But perhaps, at this moment, Brandon is regretting the fact that he’d found the glide and been sent by us to this dusty point of land to explore a virgin run. This experience is what he got for his effort. He and Joshua Thompson—his buddy chosen to come along to join the “fun.” Other than downwind bump, they rarely see waves or shore pound in their home waters.

Waves introduce a learning curve all their own and we’d faced that the day before. Timing is everything in a paddle out through the surf and as anyone who has spent time in the surf can tell you, it’s less than an exact science, something that no one every totally masters, regardless of experience. The ocean’s the boss.

But here we are, the only put-in within a 45-minute drive along Baja dirt roads—rutted, washed-out, pot-holed tracks capable of demolishing the suspension of any vehicle. If we want to paddle downwind, this is the place to do it. And now is the time.

2

Mexican adventures often start before you even arrive in country. In this case, we stood on the tarmac of Brown Field, a dilapidated San Diego airport less than two miles from the border. Jose says hello in slightly broken English. He smiles using his two fake front teeth and nods his head heartily, like working his neck will help us communicate more clearly. Whatever he keeps in his fanny pack rustles at the motion. He waves for us to get in the single prop Cessna, a four-seater painted in a scale of browns, complete with rich, soil-colored carpet straight out of that greatest of interior design decades, the 1970s.

Once in the plane, he says nothing. No warnings, no precautions, not even, “Put your seatbelt on.” He moves the myriad of nobs in the machine quickly. That must mean he knows what he’s doing. Right? We rattle down the runway and magically lift into the air and angle south. In less than a minute we’re over the Great Fence of America and into Mexican airspace.

We’re headed 50 miles southeast of El Rosario, Mexico to Punta San Carlos, where a looming mesa towers above the landscape and hems in the scattered houses of a small fishing village at the water’s edge. There are the waves below the cliffs, over the kelp, above the rock-shelf reef. They disappear with the tide, but always reappear, sometimes out front, sometimes down the point, sometimes off the reefs that protect an island covered in hundreds of pelicans. Trails head back into the arroyos, sinuous and dusty and in the morning and evening, they’re inviting. But in the heat of the bare-desert day with the sun beating down, they’re a water-less furnace.

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And then there is the wind. You could almost—almost—tell the time by its consistency. It blows the same way 80 percent of the year they say, exhaling down the coast from the west and dancing in a line followed by whitecaps.

Which is exactly what we find as we fly down the coast, turn up into the 25-knot breeze and land on the gravel runway, rocks pinging off the bottom of the plane.

On Day Two, though, the wind is blowing the wrong way. Which is odd, the locals say. With the steady west winds that make the place so famous for wind- and kitesurfing, we would know exactly what we needed to do. But it isn’t and so we don’t. We’re itching to explore the coast and the heaving bump run that it frames. The thought of linking epic glides has us all feeling antsy.

We’re not alone in our wait. Others—20 or so men (and a couple hardened women) that range from real estate developers to engineers to van-inhabiting vagabonds—are here for the same wind. They have their windsurf setups or their kites and when the wind comes up, they’re ready to harness it, just like us.

 

3
Luckily, we’re waiting in the hospitality of San Carlos with Solosports Adventure Holidays. Kevin Trejo, the owner, has been bringing people here for 26 years, and his business is fully set up to do the only three things that there are to do here: recreate, eat and drink.

“It’s like summer camp for adults,” I hear someone say as I head for another beer.

A nearly perfect description. “Summer camp for endorphin junkies,” may be more accurate. Trejo, a junky himself, knows how to cater to these types: all the gear you need to take advantage of the landscape—paddles, sails, kites, SUPs, surfboards, kiteboards and mountain bikes—is stored and maintained for the guests.

6

As the conditions change there are decisions to be made—should we go mountain biking with the French-Canadian Quebecois or go out for a SUP surf over the reef? But there’s also a wave showing during the bigger sets on an outer reef that looks good for a shortboard. Is it too early for a beer? Or should we just read a book until we fall asleep in our tents overlooking the waves? Big decisions. For Brandon and Josh, the decision is easy. They spend most of their days paddle surfing on the reef out front or around the corner of the bay at a fast, running right called the Chili Bowl. They’re really taking to this lifestyle and starting to dial in their boards.

As the sun slips behind the curtain of the Pacific the wind jockeys congregate at the open-air bar, to watch the last waves of the evening be ridden and toast to another unreal day of play, far, far away from whatever lives we have back home.

We sip an unlimited supply of Baja Fogs, a diabolically delicious beverage consisting of a Corona or Pacifico with its empty neck space filled with tequila and topped off with lime. Deciding how many Baja Fogs to drink per evening balanced against how you would feel in the morning is one of the biggest challenges of the day. The wind’s variability makes that an easy decision. Another round of Fogs it is.

SUPP-140500-F_MEX-49

To get good at anything you have to push your body and mind, to try things you’ve never tried before. This is especially important in the ocean, where the list of variables that affect you are greater than just about any other sport.

About a month into my standup surfing career, I decided it would be a good idea to paddle out to a wave breaking off a river mouth—a left—that was well overhead and featured a massive current streaming out of the drainage due to fall rains. Side-offshore winds were blowing and I had a board I’d never ridden before. In hindsight it seems like a bad idea— it was—but at the time I wanted to test my new standup skills.

So out I paddled. I was wobbly on the narrow board, getting bumped by the side chop from the wind and the rebound from the waves bouncing off the nearby jetty. I fell into the brown runoff a handful of times before I even got to the lineup. Once there I sat on my board, already tired. Then a set came. I took off paddling on my chest with my blade underneath me and clawed over the first two waves but wasn’t so lucky on the next two, feeling my leash stretch close to its breaking point as I got tossed around in the murky water. When my beating ceased I was so frazzled that the current pulled me around the outside of the river jetty and into the open ocean where the waves were double overhead. I drifted far down the beach, dodging sets and trying to get one to the beach. I finally caught a monster and straight-lined down the choppy face in to the sand.

I was humbled and had caught one wave for my efforts. But I’d learned that I could survive that kind of ocean on a standup and I saw the possibilities if I kept at it. Stoked, that session pushed me to prepare for the next time I encountered similar conditions.

5

I see that same determined look in Brandon’s eyes as he stares out at the ocean and prepares to face the daunting paddle out for the second time. When we tell him when to start paddling in a lull between sets, he turns off his mind, hits the water fast, paddles hard and makes it to the outside with dry hair. No broken rudders today.

We cruise in a light downwind breeze, the whitecaps pushing us along in infrequent glides. Even though it isn’t smoking like the day before, the sea cliffs, the open ocean swell, the sea lions coming to inspect us and the fact that we are the only ones to have downwind paddled here make for a unique and peaceful run.

But the ocean isn’t quite done with us yet. As we near the end of the paddle we must cross numerous reefs and draw closer to the cliffs to come into camp. A rogue set stands up on the outside and catches us unaware. Someone yells and we’re all scrambling to beat the dark wall of green water that closes in on us. We all barely scratch over it and Brandon gets dumped out the back. He comes up unfazed with a big, white grin on his face. He’s learning to go with the flow of the ocean and loving it.

8

We swing in through a slot between two reefs off the north side of the camp and shoot for a keyhole on the inside. On the way, we pass the Mummy, a large rock covered in the delectable combination of mussels and bird shit. We slip past the Mummy’s sharp grasp and onto the beach. Brandon names the bump run in its honor: the Mummy’s Knuckle.

Time disappears and what concurrently feels like a brief stay and a long rest is soon past. We all agree: Punta San Carlos is a downwind dream. When there’s wind. In four days we only complete two runs. We’re assured this is a rare phenomenon but honestly, we don’t care too much. We’ve eaten fresh Mexican food prepared by the local staff and worked it all off in the surf. When the waves and wind didn’t cooperate we biked and when it was too hot we napped. Brandon and Josh got fully hooked on SUP surfing. And when the wind was up, we pioneered a new run in a new place. Everybody talks about coming back to explore the myriad of runs possible along this empty stretch of coast.

As the planes show up to shuttle us back to the States so does the breeze. The Mummy’s Knuckle looks perfect with steady 25-knot winds and miles of bumps. But Jose is here with his fanny pack and fake teeth and ‘70s-era plane. We rattle down the runway and take off into the wind.

SUPP-140500-F_MEX-05

 

The post Finding The Glide appeared first on SUP Magazine.

A Skeptic Looks at SUP Yoga

SUP yoga instructor and founder of In Love Yoga and Music, Talee Roony, serenades a yoga class taught by fellow instructor, Amelia Travis during a SUP yoga workshop at Mother's Beach in Marina del Rey. Photo by Rachael Thompson Photography

SUP yoga instructor and founder of In Love Yoga and Music, Talee Laurén, serenades a yoga class taught by fellow instructor, Amelia Travis during a SUP yoga workshop at Mother’s Beach in Marina del Rey. Photo by Rachael Thompson Photography

A Skeptic Looks at SUP Yoga

When SUP yoga really caught on a few years ago, I brushed it off as a fleeting fad—a gimmick that inundated my Instagram feed and nothing else. These yogis had it backwards, I thought. Standups are meant for one thing: standing. Not sitting, not stretching; definitely not downward facing dogs or child’s poses. I clung to a narrow mentality: Standup paddlers stretch to paddle, not the other way around.

But, as time went by, the fad never faded. Just the opposite; it got more popular. Many of my yogi friends made the switch from sand to SUP. I even heard some guys in the lineup at Black’s Beach in San Diego talking about a SUP yoga class they took in Mission Bay. Despite my disregard, it was clear: SUP yoga is here to stay.

To understand why, I tracked down Talee Laurén, certified SUP yoga instructor and founding guru of In Love Yoga and Music in San Clemente. Talee takes a unique approach to SUP yoga. She’s also a talented musician, and uses her ukulele to serenade her classes during their flow for a uniquely calming and spiritual spin. I figured, if anyone could, Talee would be the one to make me a believer.

I asked her, “What’s all this SUP Yoga fuss about?” She responded with a question of her own: “Well, have you tried it?”

Me? No, never. Why would I? I’m a paddler. I’m a surfer. I stretch to SUP. That’s it.

“SUP yoga is such a healthy experience in itself,” Talee said. “Getting out in nature, poising your body, going through flows and breathing exercises on the water—it totally opens your body and mind. But it’s also a really good balance exercise.”

“Yoga is one of the best things you can do for your paddling and surfing. If you can, why not do it on the same tool you use to surf and paddle?”

I decided to give it a try. Talee offered to give me a lesson on her personal board, which was designed specifically for yoga (so much for my theory that SUPs are made solely for standing). The board had very little rocker and was much wider than most standups, built for stability. I found it was much more secure than even the bulkiest of beginner boards.

I paddled out from Baby Beach into Dana Point Harbor with Talee to begin my lesson. She brought along her ukulele and spirits were high as a cool afternoon breeze nudged us gently out into the sprawling marina. Even before the flow began, my skepticism of SUP yoga began to unravel. The setting alone—the calmly rocking water, the warm hue of Southern California’s golden hour, the music, the company of an enlightened enthusiast—was enough incentive for an old dog to learn new tricks.

talee rooney headstand

Talee Rooney, a master of SUP Yoga, puts on a fine display of the more advanced techniques. (Eds note: Mike did not try this pose)

Then came the actual yoga. I’ve been through Vinyasa flows before in classroom settings, I’ve even endured my share of Hatha (better known as hot yoga), but my experience that day eclipsed all preconceptions, both physically and mentally. The added necessity for balance commanded complete focus, planting me firmly in the moment and delivering a meditative state like none I’d experienced through yoga before. The poses were amplified by the fluidity of the moving board, and paralleled the challenges of balance and stability that surfing demands. I finally understood: yoga and SUP are a match made in paddlers’ heaven.

By the time I made it back to the beach—lightened, enlightened, glowing with endorphins and soothingly sore—I was converted. My original theory still applies—standups are for standing. But standups are also for sitting and slowing down, stretching, meditating, breathing, even downward facing dog and child’s pose. The capabilities of our SUP is limited only by our minds. The potential for expanding your standup practices are boundless. And if you’re still a skeptic, like I once was, don’t take it from me. Get out there and try it for yourself.

For more info on Talee Laurén and In Love Yoga and Music, click here.

To get involved in SUP yoga in Orange County, check out Paddleboard Bliss Yoga.

For SUP yoga in San Diego, check out San Diego Paddle Yoga.

For SUP yoga teacher trainings, check out Stoked Yogi.

For more on SUP Yoga from SUP magazine, click here.

The post A Skeptic Looks at SUP Yoga appeared first on SUP Magazine.

A Skeptic Looks at SUP Yoga

SUP yoga instructor and founder of In Love Yoga and Music, Talee Roony, serenades a yoga class taught by fellow instructor, Amelia Travis during a SUP yoga workshop at Mother's Beach in Marina del Rey. Photo by Rachael Thompson Photography

SUP yoga instructor and founder of In Love Yoga and Music, Talee Laurén, serenades a yoga class taught by fellow instructor, Amelia Travis during a SUP yoga workshop at Mother’s Beach in Marina del Rey. Photo by Rachael Thompson Photography

A Skeptic Looks at SUP Yoga

When SUP yoga really caught on a few years ago, I brushed it off as a fleeting fad—a gimmick that inundated my Instagram feed and nothing else. These yogis had it backwards, I thought. Standups are meant for one thing: standing. Not sitting, not stretching; definitely not downward facing dogs or child’s poses. I clung to a narrow mentality: Standup paddlers stretch to paddle, not the other way around.

But, as time went by, the fad never faded. Just the opposite; it got more popular. Many of my yogi friends made the switch from sand to SUP. I even heard some guys in the lineup at Black’s Beach in San Diego talking about a SUP yoga class they took in Mission Bay. Despite my disregard, it was clear: SUP yoga is here to stay.

To understand why, I tracked down Talee Laurén, certified SUP yoga instructor and founding guru of In Love Yoga and Music in San Clemente. Talee takes a unique approach to SUP yoga. She’s also a talented musician, and uses her ukulele to serenade her classes during their flow for a uniquely calming and spiritual spin. I figured, if anyone could, Talee would be the one to make me a believer.

I asked her, “What’s all this SUP Yoga fuss about?” She responded with a question of her own: “Well, have you tried it?”

Me? No, never. Why would I? I’m a paddler. I’m a surfer. I stretch to SUP. That’s it.

“SUP yoga is such a healthy experience in itself,” Talee said. “Getting out in nature, poising your body, going through flows and breathing exercises on the water—it totally opens your body and mind. But it’s also a really good balance exercise.”

“Yoga is one of the best things you can do for your paddling and surfing. If you can, why not do it on the same tool you use to surf and paddle?”

I decided to give it a try. Talee offered to give me a lesson on her personal board, which was designed specifically for yoga (so much for my theory that SUPs are made solely for standing). The board had very little rocker and was much wider than most standups, built for stability. I found it was much more secure than even the bulkiest of beginner boards.

I paddled out from Baby Beach into Dana Point Harbor with Talee to begin my lesson. She brought along her ukulele and spirits were high as a cool afternoon breeze nudged us gently out into the sprawling marina. Even before the flow began, my skepticism of SUP yoga began to unravel. The setting alone—the calmly rocking water, the warm hue of Southern California’s golden hour, the music, the company of an enlightened enthusiast—was enough incentive for an old dog to learn new tricks.

talee rooney headstand

Talee Rooney, a master of SUP Yoga, puts on a fine display of the more advanced techniques. (Eds note: Mike did not try this pose)

Then came the actual yoga. I’ve been through Vinyasa flows before in classroom settings, I’ve even endured my share of Hatha (better known as hot yoga), but my experience that day eclipsed all preconceptions, both physically and mentally. The added necessity for balance commanded complete focus, planting me firmly in the moment and delivering a meditative state like none I’d experienced through yoga before. The poses were amplified by the fluidity of the moving board, and paralleled the challenges of balance and stability that surfing demands. I finally understood: yoga and SUP are a match made in paddlers’ heaven.

By the time I made it back to the beach—lightened, enlightened, glowing with endorphins and soothingly sore—I was converted. My original theory still applies—standups are for standing. But standups are also for sitting and slowing down, stretching, meditating, breathing, even downward facing dog and child’s pose. The capabilities of our SUP is limited only by our minds. The potential for expanding your standup practices are boundless. And if you’re still a skeptic, like I once was, don’t take it from me. Get out there and try it for yourself.

For more info on Talee Laurén and In Love Yoga and Music, click here.

To get involved in SUP yoga in Orange County, check out Paddleboard Bliss Yoga.

For SUP yoga in San Diego, check out San Diego Paddle Yoga.

For SUP yoga teacher trainings, check out Stoked Yogi.

For more on SUP Yoga from SUP magazine, click here.

The post A Skeptic Looks at SUP Yoga appeared first on SUP Magazine.

The Weekly Insta: Tahiti to Saipan, Paddle it All

The Weekly Insta: Happy New Year!

Another week, another The Weekly Insta and collection of the best Instagram photos from the standup world. There’s a story in every nook of social media, and none tell it better than Instagram as athletes, coaches, events and shops use it to contribute their proverbial thousand-words. So here, we curate the best of the best so you don’t have to.

Hashtag #theweeklyinsta for your photos to be considered for the feed.

Check out more paddling imagery here.

Collected by Mike Misselwitz (@mrmizzel)

The post The Weekly Insta: Tahiti to Saipan, Paddle it All appeared first on SUP Magazine.

One Small Wave for Makaha, One Giant Leap for SUPsquatch

One Small Wave for Makaha, One Giant Leap for SUPsquatch

The SUPsquatch from C4 Waterman is giving a new definition to the term “party wave.” On paper, it’s a super-sized inflatable SUP that fits up to eight paddlers on a single board. In practice, it’s yard sales and awkward wipeouts galore. Until now, that is.

Pro surfer Jamie O’Brien’s team of SUPsquatch misfits recently gathered at Makaha Beach Park to test their skills in overhead surf. The GoPro video their session produced captures nothing short of the greatest wave ever successfully ridden by SUPsquatch. So great in fact, it’s being submitted as an entry for the GoPro of the World contest put on by GoPro and Surfline.com. Click play and watch seven men make history on one craft.

More video here.

The post One Small Wave for Makaha, One Giant Leap for SUPsquatch appeared first on SUP Magazine.

The Weekly Insta: Happy New Year!

The Weekly Insta: Happy New Year!

Welcome to The Weekly Insta, a collection of the week’s best Instagram photos from all corners of the standup world. There’s a story in every nook of social media, and none tell it better than Instagram as athletes, coaches, events and shops use it to contribute their proverbial thousand-words. So here, we curate the best of the best so you don’t have to.

Hashtag #theweeklyinsta for your photos to be considered for the feed.

Check out more paddling imagery here.

Collected by Mike Misselwitz (@mrmizzel)

The post The Weekly Insta: Happy New Year! appeared first on SUP Magazine.

Nothing But Stoke: Tahitian Downwinder

We found a New Year’s resolution: Do a downwinder as good as the one that Tahitian paddler Tamarua Cowan and company did in this video. The 30-kilometer run featured goes from Mahina on the island of Tahiti to the island of Mo’orea. While we’re not going to find a run as ridiculously perfect as this right out our front door, it’s nice to dream. Especially in the New Year.

More Tahiti paddling here.

The post Nothing But Stoke: Tahitian Downwinder appeared first on SUP Magazine.

The Weekly Insta: Santa, Kalama and Brazil

Welcome to our new feature, The Weekly Insta, a collection of the week’s best Instagram photos from all corners of the standup world. There’s a story in every nook of social media, and none tell it better than Instagram as athletes, coaches, events and shops use it to contribute their proverbial thousand-words. So here, we curate the best of the best so you don’t have to.

Hashtag #theweeklyinsta for your photos to be considered for the feed.

Check out more paddling imagery here.

Collected by Mike Misselwitz (@mrmizzel)

The post The Weekly Insta: Santa, Kalama and Brazil appeared first on SUP Magazine.

The Weekly Insta: Paris, Barrels and Ice

Welcome to our new feature, The Weekly Insta, a collection of the week’s best Instagram photos from all corners of the standup world. There’s a story in every nook of social media, and none tell it better than Instagram as athletes, coaches, events and shops use it to contribute their proverbial thousand-words. So here, we curate the best of the best so you don’t have to.

Hashtag #theweeklyinsta for your photos to be considered for the feed.

Check out more paddling imagery here.

Collected by Mike Misselwitz (@mrmizzel)

The post The Weekly Insta: Paris, Barrels and Ice appeared first on SUP Magazine.

The Weekly Insta–Winter is On!

Welcome to our new feature, The Weekly Insta, a collection of the week’s best Instagram photos from all corners of the standup world. There’s a story in every nook of social media, and none tell it better than Instagram as athletes, coaches, events and shops use it to contribute their proverbial 1000-words. So here, we curate the best of the best so you don’t have to.

Hashtag #theweeklyinsta for your photos to be considered for the feed.

Check out more paddling imagery here.

Collected by Mike Misselwitz (@mrmizzel)

The post The Weekly Insta–Winter is On! appeared first on SUP Magazine.

North American SUP Destination: Seattle, Washington

north american SUP destination, seattle, washington, puget sound, stand up paddle boarding, rob casey

Photo: Rob Casey

North American SUP Destination: Seattle, Washington

When I asked a few Seattle paddlers what they liked about living here, most commented that, yeah, they appreciate the rivers, lakes, surf and downwind runs—but they love the strong community most.

“For me the best thing is truly feeling like the stoke is for everyone,” says Troy Nebecker, founder of Monster & Sea, a SUP-inspired clothing brand that donates a percentage of it’s proceeds to cancer research each year. “From 27 people showing up in January for a downwind run from a single Facebook post—to year-round races where everyone is all smiles.”

Local paddler Boe Zinter agrees.

“The weeknight races are some of the best I’ve heard about,” Zinter says. “While other regions have bigger races, we have so many good afternoon gatherings (all year).”

In the summer there are races Monday through Thursday evenings supported by various local businesses. Despite rain and freezing temperatures, racers come out, rain or shine: “The Puget Sound is a place where you can hone your skill as a waterman all year,” says Kaliko Kahoonei.

Despite the PNW’s reputation for grey weather, it rarely snows in Seattle. Epic downwinders in winter and spring with winds up to 45 knots on both the Puget Sound and Lake Washington can bring out two dozen paddlers to a single location.

“It’s not Hawaii but it beats the midwest and northeast for winter training,” Ian McKerlich says.
Over a decade ago a few of us noticed large surf-able waves in Seattle from freighters and tugboats. A fast freighter matched with the right tides in the right location equals waist- to chest-high waves peeling for an hour, with rides longer than two minutes.

These tug waves are usually followed by a pub crawl, where we enjoy the many craft beers Seattle is known for. And celebrate in our tight-knit paddling community.
Rob Casey writes about, photographs and participates in Seattle’s SUP scene.

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Standup for the Cure: Miami Edition

Standup for the Cure: Miami Edition

The crew from Southern California’s Standup for the Cure (SUFTC) Presented by Riviera Paddlesurf brought their inspiring breast cancer awareness event to Miami, Florida on Saturday, November 8, 2013. True to form, hundreds of standup paddlers and breast cancer supporters dressed in pink jerseys to enjoy standup paddling, live entertainment, great food and camaraderie.

Founder Judie Vivian, a four-year breast cancer survivor and board member of the Orange County Susan G. Komen Affiliate, has a passion for paddling and a desire to give back to the breast cancer community. To-date, Standup for the Cure has raised well over $300,000 for early breast cancer awareness, research, treatment and education. “Our Mission is to Have Fun while saving lives,” said Vivian.

The inaugural Standup for the Cure Miami is the first step in national expansion for the group, which, in addition to Newport Beach, Calif., have hosted events in London and Mexico. “Breast cancer is prevalent throughout the world and using the healthy, active lifestyle of standup paddling as a conduit for our mission has been super successful. I don’t know of a more supportive community,” said Standup for the Cure National Event Director Dan Van Dyck.

Miami Yacht Club served as the perfect setting for the inaugural event, as paddlers showed their support at the expo and in the waterways. Global Ambassador and World SUP Champion, Zane Schweitzer, headed up the SUP instructors team to introduce breast cancer survivors and new comers to this sport. The event began with a traditional Hawaiian blessing performed by pro surfer and actor, Kala Alexander, followed by a “Sea of Pink” parade as a tribute to the survivors in attendance.

Following the ceremony, hundreds of paddlers, including Ginger Zee of Good Morning America and Julie Durda with the local 10 News crew, lined up before the yacht club for the 5k race/fun paddle. The rest of the day was filled with live music from local reggae band Commonwealth, lunch with Ruth’s Chris Steak House Coral Gables, Happy Hour with Kona Brewing Company, and lots of smiling faces. Proceeds from this event will benefit the Miami/Ft. Lauderdale Affiliate of Susan G Komen.

Donate to Standup for the Cure Miami here.

For more information, visit: Standup-for-the-Cure.org
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Miss Hawaii Contestants Standup Paddle

Miss Hawaii Contestants Standup Paddle

It only seems natural: why wouldn’t the 2014 Miss Hawaii contestants go standup paddling? So here they are getting out on the water, and even holding their paddles the right way. Rob Stehlik of Blue Planet Surf, which is sponsoring Miss Hawaii 2014, taught them well.

More swimswear paddling here.

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North American SUP Destination: Honolulu, Hawaii

North American SUP destination, honolulu, hawaii, oahu, canoes, queens, waikiki, south shore, jenny lee, ryan foley, paddle town battle, stand up paddling, paddle surfing

Photo: Ryan Foley

North American SUP Destination: Honolulu, Hawaii

Standup paddling started here. Uncle Bobby Ah Choy took pictures of tourists as a Waikiki Beach Boy standing up with a paddle. I remember being a little kid surfing Canoes and he’d be taking pictures of tourists and us kids. When I think of my childhood, I think of him standup paddling. Now, when you look at Waikiki, SUPs are everywhere. It’s part of the culture.

We use SUP for everything here: fitness, fishing, diving, exercise, surfing. We’re really fortunate because no matter where you live you’re 15 minutes away from the water. It’s really accessible. Standups are simple, light and now you see tons of women doing it too. I think there are definitely more women here paddling than other places. There are aunties, grandmas, grandpas and toddlers out there on stand ups!

Ala Moana is one of the calm, safe beaches where people can go paddle for the first time. On the weekend we have hundreds of people doing just that. I think SUP courses are even bigger than surf lessons now. Then you can move outside the reef when you’re ready to surf. Back to Waikiki you’ve got Canoes, Queens, Pops for easy waves. There are so many places to paddle in Waikiki and Ala Moana. When you’re paddling off the coast you look to your right and see Diamond Head and the mountains and when you look straight you see a big city. Having real life right across the street from our ocean—filled with turtles and dolphins—is really special.

The community is pretty interesting. You have guys that are doing the long distance downwind run from Hawaii Kai to Waikiki on the regular. Then you have the hardcore surf guys. A lot of us just squeeze it in where we can between work and our families. Some guys walk to the water from their apartments, paddle, shower then get into their suits and BMWs and head to work. There’s a little something for everyone here.
Jenny “Waikikilove” Lee is one of Honolulu’s greatest purveyors of stoke, just check out her noserides.

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Tom Jones Joins Laird Standup Team

Tom Jones, LAIRD Standup, industry news

LAIRD Standup welcomes Tom Jones to the team. Photo courtesy of LAIRD Standup.

Tom Jones Joins Laird Standup Team

LAIRD StandUp, a global standup paddle company, has officially signed ultra-endurance athlete and extreme SUP rider, Tom Jones, to the LAIRD StandUp team. Tom joins the team as a senior statesman of the sport, having already pushed the SUP envelope for many years by setting long distance paddle records. As a top rider in his age bracket, Tom brings a pedigree to the team that the younger LAIRD StandUp riders and team followers can aspire to; his intensity and consistent performance at the top level of the sport sets a precedent within the competition arena of the industry.

Tom Jones, LAIRD Standup, industry news

Tom Jones is known for his impressive SUP expeditions. Photo courtesy of LAIRD Standup.

“We are extremely excited to welcome ultra endurance athlete Tom Jones to the Laird StandUp Team. Tom has accomplished a multitude of lifetime achievements in sports, from the World Muay Tai Championships to his endurance SUP paddles from Key West to New York just to name a few. He is unstoppable when he puts his mind to it,” said Byron Seegers, Brand Manager of LAIRD StandUp. As proof of that unstoppable spirit, Tom is currently training to represent LAIRD StandUp and bring awareness to his “Resup” campaign in his goal to break another distance record by paddling from San Francisco, Calif. to Oahu, Hawaii in 2015.

In addition to his extreme athleticism, Tom Jones has put countless hours in with a number of philanthropic organizations championing the well being of today’s youth and paving the way for their future through environmental initiatives designed to improve their communities and livelihoods through eco-responsible commerce.

“Tom’s competitive achievements, result-oriented mindset, and philanthropic accomplishments are all congruous with the LAIRD brand, making Tom Jones both a valued team representative and a senior ambassador,” said Mark Paaluhi, Marketing/Team Manager of LAIRD StandUP.

Look for Jones featured in the upcoming 2014 Winter Issue of SUP magazine on newsstands December 5.
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2015 YOLO Experience at Vista Guapa

Vista Guapa, YOLO Board, adventure, surf, sup camp, costa rica, SUP

SUP Costa Rica with the Vista Guapa and YOLO crew.

A YOLO Experience at Vista Guapa

Vista Guapa Surf Camp, a proud partner of YOLO Board, will present three distinct installments of their highly anticipated YOLO Experience camps with special guests and dates set for the 2015 season. Camp ambassador Mark Salvetti will host ‘Marko’s Mardi Gras YOLO’ February 14th to February 20th, YOLO Board Team Rider Michael “Westy” Westenberger leads ‘Westy’s Spring YOLO’ March 21st to March 27th and CrossSUP founder Christian Cook closes the series with ‘Christian’s Summer YOLO’ set for July 25th to July 31st. Reservations are now being accepted for the limited opportunity SUP/surf adventure camps with the Mardi Gras YOLO Experience already sold out.

With just 12 guests per camp, the YOLO Experience offers a personalized weeklong adventure vacation with SUP and surf lessons from top local watermen including Vista Guapa co-owner Alvaro Solano, a seven-time national surfing champion and one-time masters champion. The small group environment allows for instruction to be tailored to the individual making it perfect for anything from aspiring novices to seasoned wave riders. Spend your days surfing and SUPing at the best surf breaks on Costa Rica’s breathtaking Pacific Coast along with receiving fitness training and photography instruction, participating in sightseeing excursions and enjoying homemade local cuisine.

Vista Guapa, YOLO Board, adventure, surf, sup camp, costa rica, SUP

Vista Guapa camp ambassador Mark Salvetti, enjoying his time in Costa Rica.

“Alvaro, Wendy and their crew do an amazing job making everyone feel welcome and at home at Vista Guapa,” adds Westy, Director of Operations at Chicago Paddle Company. “In addition to surfing world class waves with the best instruction available, you’re also getting an insider glimpse into the Costa Rican lifestyle. After a busy season of racing, teaching, and working, this trip is a highlight for me.”

Recently honored with a TripAdvisor® Certificate of Excellence award for 2014, Vista Guapa is a tranquil five-acre tropical oasis on a secluded hillside overlooking the Pacific yet minutes from the town center of Jaco. Guest accommodations include three air-conditioned guest bungalows, each featuring two rooms with private bathrooms and decks with hammocks and ocean views, a main house for group gatherings, a swimming pool and two open air Yoga pavilions. A recent TripAdvisor® guest review characterizes the onsite staff, “Not only were they extremely knowledgeable about local sites, flora and the surfing conditions, they were extremely friendly and full of positive attitude. Every little request was met with a smile and a ‘no problem’.”

Pricing for the Vista Guapa YOLO Experience is $1,700 per person for six nights of double occupancy with additional nights available on a pro-rated basis. Rates include SUP surfing and flat water paddling instruction, surf paddle and race technique instruction, morning workouts, a yoga session, an excursion to a national park or waterfall hike, airport transfer to/from San Jose and daily breakfast, lunch and dinner.

For more information or to make reservations, contact Mark Salvetti: markosalvetti@gmail.com.
Stay in touch with all camp happenings by following the Vista Guapa Facebook Page.
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C4 Waterman Outpost Holds Grand Opening Celebration

C4 Waterman Celebrates Outpost Grand Opening

C4 Waterman held a grand opening celebration Thursday, October 16 at their Outpost location at 515 Ward Ave. in Honolulu. This celebration launches the next chapter for the Hawaii-based brand C4 Waterman and its parent company Wenonah Canoe Inc. 
 


“This opening is a long time coming; we are beyond thrilled with our new home and everything we have to offer the paddlesports community,” said C4 Founder Todd Bradley.

The former Kanai Tofu Factory has been transformed into the flagship C4 Waterman Outpost. The showroom displays the entire line of C4 Waterman products and is filled with Hawaiian Waterman history and art. At the opening, C4 Waterman also debuted a clothing line that pays homage to and supports the Polynesian Voyaging Society’s Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage.

Bradley also explained C4’s partnership with the Polynesian Voyaging Society: “The Hokuleʻa clothing line designed by Keone Nunes and the C4 Team, features a traditional Polynesian tattoo print on clothing that is functional and fun to wear. We are excited to do our part to help raise funds for the Polynesian Voyaging Society while also spreading our shared values of teaching respect for our natural resources and the importance of ocean conservation.”

C4 Waterman will be donating 50 percent of the profits from this clothing line to the Polynesian Voyaging Society.

c4 waterman, todd bradley, brian keulana, honolulu, ward center, oahu, hawaii

The C4 family. | Photo courtesy of C4 Waterman

C4 Waterman Inc., founded in 2007, is based upon four core disciplines that apply to the ocean as much as in life: Balance, Endurance, Strength and Tradition. C4 is a waterman-created and operated paddlesports company based in Hawaii, whose founders includes some the world’s most respected watermen: Todd Bradley, Brian Keaulana, and Archie Kalepa.

To ensure the company’s position as a premier brand in the global action sports industry, C4 Waterman aligned with Wenonah Canoe, Inc. in February of 2014. The merger has improved global access to C4 Waterman products, leveraging the strength of Wenonah’s established and growing distribution network with C4’s innovative tools for rivers and oceans and water rescue equipment. 
 


The C4 Waterman Founders, Todd Bradley, Brian Keaulana, and Archie Kalepa, along with the executive team of Wenonah Canoe, Inc., Mike Cichanowski, Jim Brown and Bill Kueper, were present at the grand opening to spread their Aloha and celebrate in style.

For more information, visit: C4waterman.com
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